Assess Your Entrepreneurial Spirit

Good design is very intentional. There is very little room for ambiguity. Design is conceived, plans are crafted, and choices are made. Businesses are intentional endeavors, too. The most successful strive to unite good plans with good choices.

Interior design professionals (or any entrepreneur for that matter) should answer these types of questions about their businesses: What is my intention? How do I plan accordingly? What should my business mean to me, now and in the future?

Searching for answers to those questions invites further questions: Do I want my business to be a basic low-cost shopping service or a professional studio? Do I want it to have a brand that says “competent and affordable” or one that is demonstrably superior and pleasingly different from most of the rest? There are markets for both.

Do I intend to control my business destiny or be controlled by the market? Do I want to select my next best client or be selected by whoever comes along next? The choice is yours.

What's my value? Am I worthy or worth-too-little? You determine the answer, if you are intentionally special and different.

Risk is always right around the corner. Do I have the stomach for it? Can I endure the uncertainty of an unstable income? Am I thrilled at the thought of winning the big new client, being recognized for my design and earning the rewards that come from assuming the risk?

How will I measure my success: money, quality of life, stature, fame? How will I know when I have achieved it?

There are all of these questions, and more. How will I balance and integrate my professional life, personal life, parenting, parent-caregiving, pets and other priorities? What are life's daily priorities for me? Can I design, run a business and meet all my responsibilities?

In addition to trying to answer alone many of these questions, or even asking the right questions, consider working with a partner or mentor or consulting with a coach or consultant—those indispensable people whose wisdom and experience help entrepreneurs plan ahead and act accordingly.

So, what do we want out of all this? One thing is certain: We will only have more of the same unless we resolve our own intention to succeed. We need the courage to create a vision, plan our work, work our plan, and always live it.

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